Thomas Sheridan – The Secret Science of Sorcery – Part Two | Legalise Freedom

Thomas Sheridan – The Secret Science of Sorcery – Part Two

May 12, 2018

LEGALISE FREEDOM7

Thomas Sheridan discusses his book Sorcery – The Invocation of Strangeness.

(Stream / download audio at bottom of page. This is a two part interview. Part one is here.)

In the modern world, we no longer have time for magic, dismissing it as mere mumbo-jumbo from a less enlightened age. One might say, in fact, that the magic has gone out of our lives. Most of us, however, misunderstand just what magic is – a mechanism for manipulating the world around us, which through suppression and since the ascent of the scientific era, has mostly faded from memory. Yet this force lives on and indeed is fundamental to the very fabric of the Universe.

Probing deeper, we find that most of that which makes up all that apparently exists – in the form of dark matter and dark energy – remains a mystery to modern mainstream science. We discover that conventional notions of time, space, and matter are illusions and that reality is subjective, malleable, and made up of myriad unseen, unknown levels. We learn that our beliefs and expectations, our desire and will, play a part in shaping reality and in doing so, we understand that we can manipulate the mechanics of the non-material toward our own ends. Materialist science may reject mind over matter, but it’s real enough. From particle physics to psychic powers, and from Donald Trump to 9/11, we roam the realms where science and sorcery are one and the same, and nothing or nowhere is quite what it seems.

Previous interviews with Thomas Sheridan:
The Anvil of the Psyche
Consciousness Parasites and Psychopathic Society
Rise of the Nazi Death Cult
The Druid Code: Magic, Megaliths and Mythology

Bumper music:
Cliff Martinez ‘Traffic OST’
Tangerine Dream ‘Sorcerer’

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Thomas Sheridan – The Secret Science of Sorcery – Part One

May 7, 2018

Thomas Sheridan Sorcery

Thomas Sheridan discusses his book ‘Sorcery – The Invocation of Strangeness’. In the modern world, we no longer have time for magic, dismissing it as mere mumbo-jumbo from less enlightened times. One might say, in fact, that the magic has gone out of our lives. Most of us, however, misunderstand just what magic is – a mechanism for manipulating the world around us, which through suppression and since the ascent of the scientific age, has mostly faded from memory. Yet this force lives on and indeed is fundamental to the very fabric of the Universe.

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Phil Escott – Why Eat Meat? The Case for Carnivores

April 22, 2018

Phil Escott

Phil Escott discusses the possible benefits and potential challenges of a carnivore diet. Although vegetarian and vegan diets have long been promoted as healthier alternatives to the carbohydrate and sugar saturated Western diet, in recent years much has been made of paleo, ketogenic, and similar low carb diets which attempt to emulate the eating patterns if not the entire lifestyle of our ancient ancestors. There is another alternative, however, now re-emerging, which takes some of those ideas a stage further – the complete, or near-complete, carnivore diet. Controversial and subject to some scathing criticism, it nonetheless offers options to those finding their current food regime unsatisfying, unhealthy or otherwise no longer acceptable.

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James Howard Kunstler – The Geography of Nowhere

March 15, 2018

JHK 2

James Howard Kunstler discusses his book ‘The Geography of Nowhere – The Rise and Decline of America’s Man-Made Landscape’. First published in 1994 but sadly more relevant than ever, ‘The Geography of Nowhere’ traces America’s evolution from a nation of Main Streets and coherent communities to a land where every place is like no place in particular, where the cities are dead zones, and the countryside is a wasteland of cartoon architecture and parking lots. In elegant and often hilarious prose, Kunstler depicts America’s evolution from the Pilgrim settlements to the modern car-centric suburb in all its ghastliness, adding up the huge economic, social, and spiritual costs that the U.S. is paying for its gas-guzzling lifestyle.

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Rupert Sheldrake – Science and Spiritual Practices

March 1, 2018

Rupert Sheldrake

Biologist, parapsychological researcher, and author of ‘The Science Delusion’ Rupert Sheldrake discusses his latest book ‘Science and Spiritual Practices’. In this pioneering work Sheldrake shows how science helps validate seven practices on which all religions are built, and which are part of our common human heritage: meditation, gratitude, connecting with nature, relating to plants, rituals, singing and chanting, and pilgrimage and holy places. The effects of spiritual practices are now being investigated scientifically as never before, and many studies have shown that religious and spiritual practices generally make people happier and healthier.

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Jim Elvidge – The Universe… Solved!

February 26, 2018

Jim Elvidge

Jim Elvidge discusses his book ‘The Universe – Solved! A New Provocative View of the True Nature of Reality’. Have you ever felt that there was something odd about the world we live in? Something about reality that isn’t quite random, as it should be? Something a little too organized, a little too planned, a little too programmed? What if reality isn’t really what you think it is? What if our world is just like one big video game? According to Elvidge, it’s actually not as far-fetched as it seems. Within 30 years, he maintains that we will be able to create virtual environments indistinguishable from our current reality. Within a few more decades, even physical realities will be manufactured. He also believes that we are marching toward an inevitable merge with machines and artificial intelligence. What’s more, we may even have already reached that point and it’s simply impossible to tell.

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John Michael Greer – The Retro Future: Looking to the Past to Reinvent the Future

February 18, 2018

John Michael Greer Retro Future 2

John Michael Greer discusses his book ‘The Retro Future – Looking to the Past to Reinvent the Future’. To most people paying attention to the collision between industrial society and the hard limits of a finite planet, it’s clear that things are going very, very wrong. We no longer have unlimited time and resources to deal with the economic and environmental crises that define our future, and the options are limited to the tools we have on hand right now. ‘The Retro Future’ is about one very powerful idea: deliberate technological regression. Technological regression isn’t about ‘going back’ – it’s about using the past as a resource to meet the needs of the present, and maybe the future too. It starts from the recognition that older technologies generally use fewer resources and cost less than modern equivalents, and it embraces the heresy of technological choice – our ability to choose or refuse the technologies pushed by corporate interests. People are already ditching smartphones and going back to so-called ‘dumb phones’ and land lines, and e-book sales are declining while printed books rebound. Clear signs among many that blind faith in progress is faltering and opening up the possibility that the best way forward may well involve looking back.

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Gary Lachman – Beyond The Robot: The Life and Work of Colin Wilson – Part Three

January 30, 2018

Gary Lachman Wilson part 3

In part three, we consider how Wilson’s worldview differed from that of many in the literary movement he was all-too-often lumped in with, the so-called ‘angry young men’ such as John Osborne and Kingsley Amis who rose to prominence during the 1950s. Wilson held an unfashionable belief in the power of self-improvement over and above that of social protest or utopian politics. Indeed, his ideas about the possible emergence of a New Human, physically and mentally improved, coupled with his criticism of what he saw as the widespread denial of genius and worm’s-eye view of the World, were in certain circles condemned as nothing less than fascist.

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Thomas Lombardo – Future Consciousness: The Path to Purposeful Evolution

January 6, 2018

Thomas Lombardo

Thomas Lombardo discusses his book ‘Future Consciousness – The Path to Purposeful Evolution’. We stand at what many consider to be a pivotal juncture in human history. Just as technological advancements race ahead with digitization and automation changing the face of society at breathtaking speed, so too we face unprecedented economic, political, social, and environmental crises. In response, many of us attempt to ignore these pressing problems by simply shutting down, lost in the past or the future, the good old days or daydreams of better times to come. Meanwhile, practitioners in the burgeoning field of pop psychology urge us to live in the present moment, the only thing that apparently exists. Both mindsets, however, may prove to be psychological dead-ends.

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Mark Olly – The Way of Wyrd: Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer

January 1, 2018

The Way Of Wyrd

Mark Olly discusses the novel ‘The Way of Wyrd – Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer’. Written by psychologist and university professor Brian Bates and published in 1983, ‘The Way of Wyrd’ is the story of Wat Brand, a Christian scribe sent on a mission deep into the forests of pagan Anglo-Saxon England where he finds his beliefs shaken to their core. With Wulf, a wizard, as his guide, Wat is instructed in the magical lore of plants, runes, fate, and life force until finally he journeys to the spirit world on a quest to encounter the true nature of his own soul.

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